A Day In The Life: School of Education international student Paweena

Day in the life of student PaweenaHi! My name is Paweena Sribuachum. I am an MSc Education student at the School of Education, University of Bristol.

My pathway is MSc Education Leadership and Policy. I was awarded the Chevening Scholarship and I came to the University of Bristol to experience a valuable opportunity in my life.

A Day in my Life

My ‘Day in the life’ in Bristol starts with waking up in the morning (some days late!) after trying to do a ton of pre-reading activities last night. The tutors recommend that it should be selective. I follow their advice, and found I like it. Then having a cup of coffee, dress, and go to school by climbing up the hill for my morning exercise. In case of oversleeping, I catch a bus instead! (more…)

An African Feminist Framework project

people's hands working together n Blog by Dr Zibah Nwako, PhD

I am super thrilled to announce that I have been awarded a prestigious ESRC (Economic and Social Research Council) Postdoctoral* Fellowship for my impact project: “Towards an African feminist framework for students’ welfare in Nigerian Higher Education”. The application process was highly competitive and I was informed that there were 28 applications received for only 7 fellowship places.

*Postdoctoral [adj.] – relating to advanced work or study that someone does after completing their PhD

(Cambridge Dictionary)

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Summer 2021 education document summaries: SEND, Covid-19, curriculum and more

Blog by Helen Aberdeen, School of Education, University of Bristol

As the academic year draws to a close and school colleagues look forward to a well-earned (and desperately needed!) break, time to take a look back over the last 6 months in education through the lens of the Document Summary Service (to be known from September as the Education Policy and Research Service).

So…here are the Top Ten of most downloaded summaries: (more…)

Tips for perfecting your undergraduate dissertation: SoE UG alumna, Ahanah Bhatnagar

School of Education recent UG alumna Ahanah BhatnagarSchool of Education alumna Ahanah Bhatnagar offers some top tips for writing your undergraduate dissertation – from a student who’s completed theirs

I submitted my final assignment for my undergraduate degree two months ago. It is safe to say that my focus this year was the dissertation unit. My dissertation focused on racial inequalities in education, specifically exploring the experiences of ethnic minority educators in Bristol. During the nine-month writing process, I came across several obstacles and challenges. However, I also learnt a lot of tips which I’m hoping to share with students both in the early stages of their degree, and those entering their final year, so their dissertation journey can be a smoother process. (more…)

Going Global! Education research at the University of Bristol

Blog post by Nidia Aviles Nunez, PG, Education, School of Education, University of Bristol and Dr Janet Orchard, School of Education, University of Bristol

There have been so many low points to life in a pandemic over the past year, we were keen to share one positive opportunity we have enjoyed from engaging in online video conversations with people on the other side of the world. We have been involved in a dialogue between teachers and teacher educators based in Bristol and in Hong Kong called ‘Going Global’, building on an earlier round of dialogues pre-pandemic also including pre-service teachers from Stellenbosch, South Africa. (more…)

What’s ‘what’ in RE: Relating the what, the how and the why of curriculum content

Blog post by Dr David Lewin, University of Strathclyde, and Dr Janet Orchard, School of Education, University of Bristol

We welcome the research report on Religious Education recently published by Ofsted, the inspectorate for schools in England led by Dr Richard Kueh, whose academic engagement with the subject is widely respected.

Kueh’s report has already inspired some interesting responses across the RE community, so we thought we should join the conversations. To be upfront about our own interests here, we are academics currently planning a research project called ‘After Religious Education’ in which we hope to explore many similar issues informed by the expertise of teachers, academics in Religious Studies, and academics in Education Studies. (more…)

Salma’s story: What is it like to conduct doctoral research during a pandemic?

Blog post by Salma Al Saifi, doctoral researcher at the School of Education, University of Bristol

The spread of the worldwide pandemic of Covid-19 with all the strict measures and restrictions applied to minimize its impact on people’s lives have posed a serious challenge to the conduct of my research project. For instance, conducting fieldwork such as interviews and classroom observations during such circumstances was problematic and challenging for me. (more…)

Undergraduate Open Week: Why study Psychology in Education at Bristol University?

Undergraduate Open Week 2021 special Q & A | Liv Fowler, Psychology in Education undergraduate student, School of Education, University of Bristol

Hello! Would you mind telling us a little bit about yourself?

Hi, my name is Liv and I study Psychology in Education at the School of Education, Bristol University,  and when I am not at university I live in Devon with my family.

While being home more this year I decided to train as an immuniser in the NHS to help vaccinate the country against Covid-19 which has been an amazing experience. I love spending time with my nephews Bertie and Hugo and I do have a slight obsession with Bubble Tea! (more…)

The effects of Covid-19 on pre-existing inequalities in the UK

Blog by Jáfia Naftali Câmara Doctoral Researcher, School of Education, University of Bristol

The Covid-19 pandemic has profoundly impacted not only lifestyle and work, but also how people access education and learning. The effects of Covid-19 on education have accentuated the inequalities already embedded within the UK’s education system and demonstrated the relationships between deep-rooted educational, systemic and economic inequalities.

Disadvantaged students, including refugees and asylum seekers living in Britain, face many barriers such as digital exclusion and food poverty. Poor immigrant children are also affected by immigration laws and procedures that exclude them from accessing vital services and support. In response to the effects of Covid-19, the UK government’s policy interventions have made centralised decisions enabling for profitable opportunities for education businesses and unsatisfactory support services for disadvantaged communities. (more…)